February 6 – The Sky’s A Rockin’!

Today’s factismal: Nearly 42,000 meteorites hit the Earth every year.

Odds are, you’ve seen the really cool dashboard video of the meteor that light up the sky in Illinois and Wisconsin last night. Right now, we don’t know much about this particular meteor other than it was big and bright. We don’t know if it landed somewhere on Earth like the 42,000 other meteorites than come to ground each year or if it headed back out into space like the The Great Daylight Fireball of 1972. We’re not even sure where it came from – was it a piece of a comet or a chunk of an asteroid?

The Great Daylight Fireball of 1972 (Image courtesy and copyright James M. Baker)

The Great Daylight Fireball of 1972 (Image courtesy and copyright James M. Baker)

What we do know is that there will be nearly 70 different chunks of rock and ice that speed by the Earth in February alone! They’ll zoom past at distances ranging from just outside the atmosphere to 78 times the distance to the Moon. They range in size from the size of a tiny house (about 36 ft) to the size of a tiny village (about a mile across). These rocks are made up of chunks of comets and asteroids and even bits of Mars and the Moon that have been blasted into space by impacts from other chunks of rock!

A meteor streak across the Milky Way (My camera)

A meteor streak across the Milky Way
(My camera)

What is important about these chunks of rock is that they tell us how dynamic our Solar System is. Instead of being a dead old system with an orbit for everything and everything in its orbit, the Solar System is a dynamic, ever-changing system with the planets and comets and asteroids interacting to change orbits and thrown new stuff in new places. And they can provide us with samples from other planets and from the earliest formation of the system. Besides which, they are just plain pretty!

A meteorite as seen from above the atmosphere  (Image courtesy NASA/Ron Garan)

A meteorite as seen from above the atmosphere
(Image courtesy NASA/Ron Garan)

But the best thing about meteor is that you can help scientists learn more about them! If you download NASA’s Meteor Counter App (available for iPad, iPhone, and iWannaMeteor), then you’ll be able to send NASA scientists valuable information on the number of meteors that hit during the shower. They’ll then use that information to help us understand how likely it is that we’ll get hit. To learn more, go to NASA’s web site:
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/13dec_meteorcounter/

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