June 5 – All Wet

Today’s Factismal: Tropical Storm Allison did $5,500,000,000 in damage, making it the costliest tropical storm in US history.

It is hurricane season again, and that means that small disturbances over the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean might grow into larger one. And, if they are very, very lucky, then they can gain enough energy from the water evaporated by the ocean to grow into a tropical storm. And if they are luckier still, then they turn into a hurricane. This year, experts believe that we’ll get a quieter season than usual. They expect fewer than 13 named storms, fewer than six of which will turn into hurricanes, and just a couple of major hurricanes (think Katrina).

An aerial view of flooded Houston (Image courtesy KHOU)

An aerial view of flooded Houston
(Image courtesy KHOU)

An aerial view of flooded Houston (Image courtesy KHOU)

An aerial view of flooded Houston
(Image courtesy KHOU)

But the storms don’t have to become hurricanes to do a lot of damage. Perhaps the best example of that is Tropical Storm Allison. Though Allison never grew large enough or strong enough to form an “eye”, it was nevertheless the worst tropical storm ever to hit the continental United States. In some parts of Texas, Allison dropped 40 inches of rain in just two days. The storm caused widespread flooding, displacing some 30,000 people and doing more than $5.5 billion in damage (that’s $7.1 billion in current money). Unfortunately, Allison also killed some 41 people (23 in Texas alone); the total would have been much higher but for the warnings and other information put out by the National Weather Service.

Rafting down the main street in Houston after Allison (Image courtesy KHOU

Rafting down the main street in Houston after Allison
(Image courtesy KHOU)

However, the National Weather Service is only as good as their data. And they need more data and better data. And they’d like you to provide it. They have partnered with the Citizen Weather Observer Program, which is a group of citizen scientists like you who take regular readings of temperature, humidity, rainfall, and other weather-related measurements and then pass them onto the National Weather Service using free software (available on the website). If this sounds like something you’d like to do, then head on over to
http://wxqa.com/cwop_info.htm

One thought on “June 5 – All Wet

  1. Pingback: June 20 – Disco Volante – Little facts about science

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