January 1 – Today is for troublemakers

Today’s Factismal: Ceres has had ten different names.

Ceres has been called many things. When Giuseppe Piazzi first observed it in 1801, he called it a comet. But Johan Bode decided that it was in the right place to be the “missing planet” he was looking for between Mars and Jupiter, and so he called it a planet and gave it an astronomical symbol. Unfortunately for Ceres, astronomers soon discovered over a hundred more “missing planets” in the same neighborhood, and they took to calling it a minor planet (astronomers get upset whenever there are more than ten planets; nobody knows why) when they didn’t call it an asteroid (astronomy speak for “tiny little star-like thingamabob”). And then, when yet more Pluto-sized objects were found in the outer Solar System, Ceres was reclassified yet again as a dwarf planet (see the previous note about astronomers and numbers bigger than ten).

An image of Ceres, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope

An image of Ceres, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope

Even its name is a subject for debate. In America, it is known as Ceres, for the Roman goddess of the harvest. But the Greeks have never consented to that name; they prefer to call it Demeter (which causes all kinds of confusion as there is another asteroid known as 1108 Demeter). And the Germans prefer to call it Hera for reasons that are inscrutable to anyone but a German.

What is not in doubt is that Ceres is large enough to be shaped into a ball by its gravity, and that it has an interior that is divided into an icy outer part, a rocky middle section, and a metallic core (i.e., meets the definition of planet for everyone but the IAU). It is also possible that Ceres has an inner ocean between the outer icy part and the rocky middle; this is exciting because it makes Ceres one of the few places in the Solar System where life as we know it could exist. Ceres’ size and shape tell us that it is a relic of the early days of the Solar System, when everything was collapsing into small bodies that then collided to form the planets. So we can add planetismal and protoplanet to Ceres’ list of appellations.

The layers of Ceres, as we now know them. We expect to learn a lot more about Ceres once DAWN arrives there in 2015. (Image courtesy NASA)

The layers of Ceres, as we now know them. We expect to learn a lot more about Ceres once DAWN arrives there in 2015. (Image courtesy NASA)

Right now, the DAWN spacecraft is on its way to Ceres. Planetologists (i.e., the folks who still classify Pluto as a planet) plan to study the asteroid in order to learn more about how planets form and develop over time, and to see evidence of the early history of the Solar System. They’ll also compare Ceres, which is the largest asteroid, with Vesta, which is the second largest and was visited by DAWN last year. As part of the NASA mission, JPL has launched the Asteroid Mappers website, where you can help to identify features on Ceres and Vesta:
http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/DawnCommunity/asteroid_mappers.asp

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