September 21 – For Every Season

Today’s factismal: Today is the first day of autumn, the twenty-first day of autumn, and the forty-fourth day of autumn.

Right now, you are probably scratching your head, wondering if I’ve lost my mind. How can one season start three different times?The answer lies, as it so often does, in the ineluctable propensity of mankind to name things. Back in the days of the early Roman kings (about 2,700 years ago), the calendar ran from late spring to early winter and then went silent for a couple of months. The Romans held various fertility and harvest festivals to celebrate the seasons, but the actual date when those were held slipped around a bit thanks to those missing two months. It wasn’t until Julius Caesar fixed the calendar that we started seeing folks who could say with any authority (a legion of armed men is authority, right?) that Spring was officially over and Summer had begun.

The interesting thing is that, while the various Roman provinces didn’t like the Romans very much (after all, what had Rome done for them other than the aqueducts, sanitation, roads, education, and the wine?), they loved the calendar because it made it easier for them to observe their religious rites and mark their seasons. And one of the most influential (at least in Europe) set of seasons was the one that modern pagans call “the Wheel of the Year”, which divided the year into four seasons (Spring, Summer, Winter, and Fall) and arranged them so that the middle of each season happened on an astronomically significant date. The middle of winter would show up on December 21 (the Winter Solstice), the middle of spring would occur on March 20 (the Vernal Equinox), the middle of summer would be on June 21 (the Summer Solstice), and the middle of fall would roll in on September 21 (the Autumnal Equinox). This method of timing the seasons lasted for more than 1,900 years; you can see its influence in things such as Shakespeare’s “Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” which takes place on the solstice.

But as we moved into the 20th century, we decided that those dates didn’t work well for us (mainly because there is nothing special to mark August 8 as the start of fall). So we came up with a new system. Being human, we came up with two new systems. The meteorologists decided around 1950 or so that the seasons would start on the first day of a specific month, so that each season was roughly the same length of time. Spring ran March, April, and May, summer took up June, July, and August, fall was September, October, and November, and winter was December, January, and February. (These seasons are generally referred to as “meteorological spring” etc.)

And at about the same time, the astronomers decided that they weren’t going to let no stinking pagans decide when the seasons started based on obsolete astrological superstitions; instead, they’d start the seasons based on the stars. So the astronomers decreed that spring would begin on the Vernal Equinox, summer would come in on the Summer Solstice, fall would commence on the Autumnal Equinox, and winter would hold sway beginning on the Winter Solstice. That this effectively shifted the seasons by half a wavelength was irrelevant; it just made more sense to the astronomers.(These seasons are generally referred to as “astronomical spring” etc.)

So, as a result, we now have three different dates to start each season. Of course, Mama Nature is famous for not reading calendars (as anyone who has been caught in a May snowstorm can attest); she starts her seasons when she wants and marks it by changes in the plants and animals. And it turns out that there are a lot of scientists who are more interested in reading her calendar than man’s. If you would like to help them do so by recording when the leaves change color or the butterflies leave or the buds blossom in your area, then why not write a few pages in Nature’s Notebook?
https://www.usanpn.org/natures_notebook

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