August 11 – Chomp!

Today’s factismal: The megalodon shark died out about 1.5 million years ago. No mater what the Discovery Channel says.

There is something sadly wrong when you get more science out of a SyFy movie than you do from a Discover Channel special. But that was the case this month, when SyFy aired Sharknado, which could almost, sorta, kinda happen, and  Discover Channel aired Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives. To put things as bluntly as possible, the Discover Channel’s show wasn’t science, it wasn’t entertaining, and it wasn’t worth a megalodon’s copralite.

A megalodon jaw, seen from the side (My camera)

A megalodon jaw, seen from the side
(My camera)

But there’s always a bright side to this sort of nonsense, and here’s the bright side for this one: it has gotten people to talking about one of the world’s coolest sharks. Megalodon (bio-speak for “huge tooth”) is mostly known from fossils of its teeth, which are typically about the size of a dinner plate (explains the name, huh?). In addition to their teeth, fossilized megalodon skeletons have been found, thanks to the fact that they had a partially calcified skeleton instead of the pure cartilage skeleton of most sharks. Though they looked a lot like a Great White shark on steroids, they were probably more closely related to the Mako (though this is still controversial in the paleontological community).

My nephews get eaten by a megalodon (My camera)

My nephews get eaten by a megalodon
(My camera)

So how big did a megalodon get? Let’s put it this way: you’d need an aquarium the size of the Gulf of Mexico if you wanted to keep one as a pet. A full-grown megalodon was up to 60 ft long and four of them would weigh as much as a blue whale. And that’s not surprising, considering that they mostly fed on whales and any other large animal foolish enough to go swimming in their neighborhood!

A megalodon hunts his prey at the Houston Museum of Natural Science (My camera)

A megalodon hunts his prey at the Houston Museum of Natural Science
(My camera)

Unfortunately for them, their prey needed large, warm, shallow oceans to thrive. And as the climate changed over the past few million years, those places became harder to find. As a result, their prey either died off or adapted to deep water existence. And when a critter’s food source goes extinct, that critter’s end isn’t far behind. As a result, the last of the megalodons died about one and a half million years ago.

But we are still finding megalodon fossils in places like Florida, Spain, and Morocco. And we’re finding all sorts of other fossils, too! If you’d like to find some of your own, why not join PaleoQuest or your local mineralogical society?
http://paleoquest.org/10.html
http://www.gcgms.org/

2 thoughts on “August 11 – Chomp!

  1. Pingback: September 10 – Innocent, I tell ya! – Little facts about science

  2. Pingback: September 10 – Innocent, I tell ya! | Little facts about science

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